Strongest Metals

Strongest Metals - The Ultimate Guide

How strong a metal is can be determined through its yield strength, compressive strength, hardness and impact strength. The four measurement standards will give the accurate strength level of any given metal, natural or artificial. Each metal has its unique properties; some are naturally occurring elements while others are alloys.

What Is Metal Strength?

It is the metal’s magnitude of resistance to compressive, or plastic deformation forces. Metal strength determines toughness and how well metal can resist fracture. Remember, this is fundamental during sheet metal fabrication process.

Carbon Steel

Carbon steel is considered to be very strong and can be used for making tools and in construction. The yield and tensile strength of carbon steel will vary depending on the carbon content of the carbon steel. Low carbon steel can have a yield strength of 47,900 psi while the tensile strength is 65,300 psi.  A high carbon steel on the other hand, gives a yield strength of about 84,800 psi and a tensile strength of about 140,000 psi.

Carbon Steel
Stainless Steel

Stainless Steel

There are various grades of stainless steel and each of them comes with different properties. Some of them come with better tensile strength while others with better yield strength depending on the alloying elements. Stainless steel can be used in applications that require strength such as constructing railways, roads, and others. Generally, stainless steel offers a good tensile and impact strength and very high corrosion resistance. The impact strength, hardness, and other properties depend on the alloying elements selected for a particular application.

Tungsten

It is a pure metal and offers the best tensile strength compared to all other metals.

Tensile strength at approximately 500,000 psi at room temperature. Besides, the metal in its pure form is highly resistant to heat or high temperatures and doesn’t melt easily. Tungsten is very brittle and this limits its use in its pure form and is best used when alloyed with other elements. The strength offered by tungsten is suitable for use in making drill bits, sharpening saws, bullets, and missiles.

Tungsten
Titanium

Titanium

Titanium can be found in its pure form and offers a higher tensile strength compared to standard steel. However, the metal is less dense and offers a high strength-to-weight ratio. The corrosion resistance in titanium is high and it can resist rust, chemicals or acids. It is extremely strong with an atomic number of 22 and weight of 47.90 the density lies between aluminum and stainless steel. It can alloy with almost all elements except copper and aluminum with iron being the best option.

Osmium

Osmium is a naturally occurring metal with a bluish-white colour and a dense structure. It has a tensile strength of approximately 3920 to 4000 Mpa with and atomic weight of 88.90585. Besides, it is extremely tough and with a melting point of 3030 degrees Celsius with a very dense structure. Due to its superior impact, tensile, compressive and yield strength, it can be used in applications such as fountain pein nib tipping. It can also be used in making electrical circuit components.

Osmium
Inconel

Inconel

Inconel is an alloy of chromium, nickel and austenite and other elements such as molybdenum. It can keep its strength even in extreme conditions like high temperatures and it can resist corrosion. Again, the metal is suitable for applications such as nuclear reactor or high-speed turbines and other high temperature applications. Besides, it has a tensile strength of approximately 1,103 Mpa and a yield strength of approximately 758 Mpa. The metal is much more expensive when compared to metals like stainless steel.

Chromium

Chromium is a naturally occurring metal with a shiny appearance and has a stable crystalline structure with a high melting point.  It is hard but brittle and works best when alloyed with other metals to give it great tensile strength.  Chromium is mostly found in stainless steel alloys where it contributes to the overall strength of the alloy. Moreover, it is the hardest metal there is with tensile a strength of 418 Mpa and yield strength of 316 Mpa suitable for electroplating.

Chromium
Iron

Iron

Iron is usually found in the alloys of steel and it is the metal used for making most tools. This metal ranks as the 6th most common element and most abundant of all elements globally. Besides, this metal can be used for making electricity pylons, bicycle chains, riffle barrels and bridges. Additionally, it has a yield strength of 246 Mpa and a tensile strength of approximately 414 Mpa. It is also found in the human red blood cells and in plants as nutrients.

Lutetium

Lutetium is a silvery-white metal which occurs naturally with a melting point of 1652.85 degrees Celsius. Moreover, it is a very expensive rare earth metals and doesn’t occur in its pure state. Additionally, its applications are in hydrogenation, alkylation and cracking. Some forms are used in cancer treatment and radiometric dating of meteorites. The tensile strength is 60 MPa but its yield strength has not been determined. It is not involved in most manufacturing processes by various industries, it is rare.

Lutetium
Vanadium

Vanadium

It is a soft and ductile metal which comes in a bright white colour and gives steel rust resistant properties. Vanadium is categorized as a transitional element and it is mostly alloyed with iron to make steels more resistant to corrosion. This metal is mostly used for making automobile parts for instance in pistons and in refining process of uranium in nuclear applications. Also, it has a tensile strength of about 800 Mpa and a yield strength of about 776 Mpa.

Factors Determining Strength Of Metals

Factors Determining Strength Of Metals
Factors Determining Strength Of Metals

Tensile Strength

This refers to the level at which a given metal can resist tension. It gives the overview of the amount of strength needed to pull or stretch the metal apart. Additionally, it would be easier to pull apart a metal with low tensile strength than one with a high tensile strength.

Compressive Strength

This measures the ability of a metal to withstand the pressure when it is squeezed together through external forces. The external force is applied on the metal to determine the extent to which it can resist being reduced in size. A metal can be tested against Mohs Hardness test scale.

Yield Strength

This tests the ability of a metal to withstand being deformed or bent permanently. It shows the elastic limit of any given metal and can be confirmed through a bend test. Besides, the point at which if the metal bending is extended, it cannot regain the original shape after removing stress.

Impact Strength

This will test the ability of the metal to resist a blow and not fracture or shatter. It gives the amount of external energy a metal can absorb when exposed to impact. Additionally, the impact strength of a metal will determine if it can be used with applications that involve impact.

Strongest Metals

More Resources:

Strength Of Materials

Metal Strength

Strength Of Metals

Top Strongest Metal

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